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December 9 2014
Tuesday, 09 December 2014

Van Cleef Memorial Medal Awarded November 2014

American Geographical Society

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

American Geographical Society Awards Van Cleef Memorial Medal to Dr. Edward Malecki

Description:  The Van Cleef Memorial Medal, awarded by the American Geographical Society (AGS), is the latest of prestigious awards to be made by the Society and is presented to Professor Edward J. Malecki of Ohio State University for outstanding work in the field of urban geography. Dr. Malecki received the medal at the American Geographical Society’s Geography 2050 Symposium at Columbia University on 19 November 2014 in New York City.

 

New York City, NY] -- [2 December 2014]--The American Geographical Society (AGS) awarded the Van Cleef Memorial Medal on November 19th at the Low Library, Columbia University, during their inaugural event Geography 2050: Mounting an Expedition to the Future. Before a varied audience of AGS Councilors, geographic scholars and innovators, press and Columbia faculty, AGS Chairman of the Honors and Awards Committee Dr. Doug Sherman and AGS President Dr. Jerome Dobson presented the award to Dr. Malecki.

 

The Van Cleef Memorial Medal was established in 1970 through a gift from Dr. Eugene Van Cleef, Professor Emeritus of Geography at the Ohio State University, who contributed the fund in memory of his wife, Frieda. In 1923 Dr. Van Cleef gave the first course in urban geography in an American University and in 1937 published the first book on urban themes by an American geographer. The award is conferred on scholars who have done outstanding original work in the field of urban geography, preferably, though not necessarily in applied rather than theoretical aspects. The medal was designed by Joseph DiLorenzo.

 

Professor Edward J. Malecki, of the Department of Geography at Ohio State University, has worked there since 2001, after a lengthy tenure at the University of Florida. He has served as the Director of the Center for Urban and Regional Analysis, is affiliated with the John Glenn School of Public Affairs, the department of City and Regional Planning, and the School of Public Policy and Management, all at Ohio State. As he travelled abroad during the 1980s and 90s, his observations of the different urban structures and lifestyles in Europe and Asia led to his “…interest in how leading world cities deal with the challenge of combining new technologies with historical urban form and architecture.” Those are his words, and they describe an incredibly successful scholarly mission, exemplified by a number of professional publications that approaches 300. He is the author or co-author of five books, including Technology and Economic Development: The Dynamics of Local, Regional and National Competitiveness, and The Digital Economy: Business Organization, Production Processes and Regional Developments. Dr. Malecki has held visiting positions at Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien and the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He has been recognized as the Dr. Martha L. Corry Faculty Fellow in Geography, at The Ohio State University, was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and received Distinguished Scholarship Honors from the Association of American Geographers.

 

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States. It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education and has been awarding medals for outstanding accomplishments in Geography for over 117 years. The mission of the American Geographical Society is to link business, professional, and scholarly worlds in the creation and application of geographical knowledge and techniques to address economic, social, and environmental problems. The Society's work serves to increase geographical knowledge and the recognition of its importance in the contemporary world. With members worldwide, the Society maintains its Headquarters in Brooklyn, New York.

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Mr. John Gould (l), Chairman of the American Geographical Society (AGS) presents the Cullum Medal to Dr. Edward Malecki (c) as Dr. Jerome Dobson (r) President of AGS looks on Wednesday evening, 19 November 2014 in New York.

 

Contact Information: 
American Geographical Society
32 Court Street
Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404
Telephone: 718-624-2212
Fax: 718-624-2239
Email: 
ags@amergeog.org
www.amergeog.org

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9 December 2014
Tuesday, 09 December 2014

Cullum Medal Awarded November 2014

American Geographical Society

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

American Geographical Society Awards Cullum Medal to Dr. Lee Schwartz

Description:  The Cullum Geographical Medal, awarded by the American Geographical Society (AGS), is the latest of prestigious awards to be made by the Society and is presented to the Geographer of the U.S Department of State for distinguishing himself with geographic discoveries and for the advancement of geographic science. Dr. Lee Schwartz received the medal at the American Geographical Society’s Geography 2050 Symposium at Columbia University on 19 November 2014 in New York City.

 

[New York City, NY] -- [2 December 2014]--The American Geographical Society (AGS) awarded the Cullum Medal on November 19th at the Low Library, Columbia University during their inaugural event Geography 2050: Mounting an Expedition to the Future. Before a varied audience of AGS Councilors, geographic scholars and innovators, press and Columbia faculty, AGS Chairman of the Honors and Awards Committee Dr. Doug Sherman and AGS President Dr. Jerome Dobson presented the surprise award to Dr. Schwartz.

 

The Cullum Geographical Medal was established in 1896 and was the first medal awarded by the Society. It was founded through a bequest from Major General George W. Cullum, Commandant of the United States Military Academy, who was also an AGS Councilor and Vice President from 1874-1892. According to the terms of General Cullum’s will, the medal is awarded “…to those who distinguish themselves by geographical discoveries, or in the advancement of geographical science.” Even today, every cadet who graduates from West Point gets his “Cullum number” which follows him or her through an entire career.

 

Dr. Lee Schwartz is the Director of the Office of the Geographer and Global Issues of the U.S. Department of State. He assumed the position in 2005, to become the eighth Geographer since the position was first established in 1921. Before assuming his current mantle, he served as an Analyst for Refugees/Humanitarian Emergencies, as the Division Chief for UN and Humanitarian Affairs, and the Division Chief for Global Issues. Dr. Schwartz’s current office is the official repository of the U. S. position on all national borders and sovereignty disputes. He has spearheaded the growth of personnel in the Office of the Geographer to its largest number since World War II, and oversaw the creation of the Humanitarian Information Unit – a unique interagency operation that coordinates US government information on complex emergencies.  He has led State Department and broader governmental efforts on sharing and managing geographic information for complex emergencies such as Afghanistan and Syria and for natural disaster responses, such as the Pacific Tsunami and the Haiti earthquake.  His office launched an international boundary verification process based on high resolution imagery and has designed and implemented participatory mapping initiatives related to humanitarian and environmental crises throughout Africa and elsewhere.  Schwartz’s broad areas of responsibility include topics as diverse as climate change, food and water security, wildlife and human trafficking, refugee flows, atrocities prevention, populations at risk, and human rights accountability. He was the winner of the State Department's Warren Christopher Award for Outstanding Achievement in Global Affairs. 

 

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States. It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education and has been awarding medals for outstanding accomplishments in Geography for over 117 years. The mission of the American Geographical Society is to link business, professional, and scholarly worlds in the creation and application of geographical knowledge and techniques to address economic, social, and environmental problems. The Society's work serves to increase geographical knowledge and the recognition of its importance in the contemporary world. With members worldwide, the Society maintains its Headquarters in Brooklyn, New York.

  30A2427

 

Mr. John Gould (l), Chairman of the American Geographical Society (AGS) presents the Cullum Medal to Dr. Lee Schwartz (c) with Dr. Jerome Dobson (r) President of AGS Wednesday evening, 19 November 2014 in New York.

 

 

Contact Information: 
American Geographical Society
32 Court Street
Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404
Telephone: 718-624-2212
Fax: 718-624-2239
Email: 
ags@amergeog.org
www.amergeog.org

 

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American Geographical Society

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Geography 2050 Fall Symposium Announced by American Geographical Society

 

Description: The American Geographical Society announces theme and topics for its November Symposium.  

[New York City, NY] -- [27 August 2014]--The American Geographical Society (AGS) will hold its Fall Symposium, “Geography 2050:  Mounting an Expedition to the Future”, on Wednesday, November 19, 2014.  Hosted by the Earth Institute at Columbia University, the one-day event will take place in the historic Low Library, site of the Pulitzer Prize Award Ceremony.  This is the inaugural event of a multi-year strategic dialog meant to help us understand the major trends that will reshape our nation and our planet between now and 2050, and the investments in data, technology and capabilities necessary to navigate our uncertain future successfully.

This Symposium offers an opportunity for professionals in industry, government, academe, and the social sector, as well as members of the general public to come together to think collectively about exploring the future, and to examine how geography, geographic thinking, and geospatial data and technologies will enable us to address these major trends proactively.

“This Symposium is going to be crucial to the formulation of policy over the next decades, bringing geography, geographic thinking, and geographic technology to address these trends that will impact our every-day lives,” said Dr. Jerome Dobson, President of AGS.  “It is a rare opportunity for thought leaders across business, government, academia, and the social sector to gather in one place to frame the discussion of forces that are going to impact all of us in virtually every aspect of our daily lives,”  added Dr. Dobson.

The Symposium will address topics including:

--Populations, Shifting Identity, and Well Being;

--Climate, Risk and Opportunity;

--The Future Energy Landscape;

--The Emerging Geography of the Internet of Things; and

--Investment, Law and Policy. 

“The American Geographical Society is proud to convene this important long term dialog in partnership with Columbia University’s Earth Institute, and we are excited to invite the participation of thinkers from every walk of life to think geographically about the major forces that will change our planet and to brainstorm the vital investments that we should make as a global society to cope with this change” said Geography 2050 Symposium Chair, Dr. Christopher Tucker – AGC Councilor and Chairman of the MapStory Foundation.

For more information on the Symposium, including registration options, go to http://geography2050.org/ .

Since 1851, AGS has been a leading advocate for geography in the United States and around the world.  The Society promotes the use of geography in business, government, science, and education.  The mission of AGS is to advance geographic knowledge and the recognition of its importance in the contemporary world.  The goal is to enhance the nation’s geographic literacy so as to engender sound public policy, national security, and human well-being worldwide.  AGS stands for explicit recognition of the geospatial and temporal contexts that shape the real world and influence how it works.  The Society maintains its headquarters in New York City, New York.

 

For more information on AGS go to www.amergeog.org.

 

 

Contact Information:

American Geographical Society

32 Court Street

Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404

Telephone:  718-624-2212

Fax:  718-624-2239

Email:  ags@amergeo.org

www.amergeog.org

American Geographical Society

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

American Geographical Society Endorses and Commends the Rockefeller Foundation for its “100 Resilient Cities” Initiative

Description: The Rockefeller Foundation has so far named 32 of the 100 cities that will make up the “100 Resilient Cities” initiative.  The American Geographical Society, which is one of the world’s oldest and leading organizations committed to geographical leadership, announced that it is endorsing the “100 Resilient Cities” initiative and commends the Rockefeller Foundation for its foresight in helping urban centers prepare for the 21st century.

[New York City, NY] -- [17 June 2014] – The American Geographical Society (AGS) announced today that it is endorsing and commending the “100 Resilient Cities” organization, pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation.

In describing the initiative, The Rockefeller Foundation notes that:

100 Resilient Cities (100RC) is dedicated to helping cities around the world become more resilient to the physical, social and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century.   100RC supports the adoption and incorporation of a view of resilience that includes not just the shocks – earthquakes, fires, floods, etc. – but also the stresses that weaken the fabric of a city on a day to day or cyclical basis.  Examples of these stresses include high unemployment; an overtaxed or inefficient public transportation system; endemic violence; or chronic food and water shortages.  By addressing both the shocks and the stresses, a city becomes more able to respond to adverse events, and is overall better able to deliver basic functions in both good times and bad, to all populations.
“Resilience is the application of what we study in geography and exemplifies the work in which the AGS has always been involved” noted Dr. Joseph Wood, AGS Councilor, and Provost at the University of Baltimore.  “The imperative before us is how we, as global citizens, can adapt to changing local and regional environments even as we grow, prosper, and consume resources at an alarming rate.   Resilience in its paramount form is about shaping—and reshaping—the built environment to ensure economic success and, indeed, cultural survival for future generations.  This initiative by the Rockefeller Foundation is perhaps the most important step so far, to frame the discussion which address this critical area for the 21st century,” added Dr. Wood.

The full description of the 100 Resilient Cities initiative can be found at:  http://100resilientcities.rockefellerfoundation.org/ .

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States.  It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education in Geography for over 163 years.  The mission of the American Geographical Society is to advance and promote geography in business, government, science, and education. Our goal is to enhance the nation’s geographic literacy so as to engender sound public policy, national security, and human well-being worldwide.  AGS seeks to engage the American public, from its youngest to its oldest citizens, with new and amazing ways to understand and characterize our changing world.  The Society maintains its headquarters in Brooklyn Heights, New York.

For more than 100 years, The Rockefeller Foundation’s mission has been to promote the well-being of humanity throughout the world. Today, the Foundation pursues this mission through dual goals: advancing inclusive economies that expand opportunities for more broadly shared prosperity, and building resilience by enabling people, communities and institutions to be prepared for, withstand, and emerge stronger from shocks and chronic stresses.  With its headquarters in New York City, the Foundation operates both within the United States and around the world. The Foundation's efforts are overseen by an independent Board of Trustees and managed by its president through a leadership team drawn from scholarly, scientific, and professional disciplines.


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American Geographical Society

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

American Geographical Society Elects Two New Councilors

Description: The American Geographical Society elected two new Councilors at its recent Council Meeting.  

 

[New York City, NY] -- [10 June 2014] –The American Geographical Society Council elected two new Councilors at its recent meeting in New York City. Elected for a three-year term were James Edward "Eddie" Pickle, CEO of Boundless and Anthony "Tony" Quartararo, President and CEO of Spatial Networks. 

James “Eddie” Pickle has worked in the geospatial industry for more than thirty years, and has been a senior executive at both well-known software (IONIC) and data (Claritas, IXI) leaders. He has worked with commercial, government, and non-profit organizations worldwide, and serves on the Steering Committee of the LocationTech industry working group. Previous to his service at Boundless, Mr. Pickle was one of the founders of IONIC Enterprise and served as its Chief Operating Officer until its purchase by ERDAS in 2007. Prior to that, he was a senior executive leading sales, data development and data solutions at Claritas (now part of Nielsen) and IXI Corporation (now part of Equifax). Mr. Pickle holds a MS in Geography from UCLA with a specialization in demography, and a BA in Geography from the University of Tennessee.

Anthony "Tony" Quartararo, has spent twenty years applying geography and geospatial technology to solving problems for governments, industry, and commercial business. Previous to his position with Spatial Networks, he was a senior executive at URS Corporation, Avineon, Inc., and the Cambric Corporation. He coined the phrase "geography is the science of everything" and has been involved in business activities in Central and South Asia, North Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and East Asia. He earned a BA in Geography/GIS from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania and did graduate work in Geography/GIS at Portland State University. 

“The American Geographical Society is honored that Eddie and Tony, eminent leaders of today’s booming popular geographics movement, have joined our Council,” said Dr. Jerome Dobson, President of AGS. “Their work is at the forefront of the industry and compliments the direction and leadership that AGS has chosen in this important aspect of geography. Geospatial technology affects every aspect of our day-to-day lives, and geography itself is more important than ever before.”

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States.  It is recognized worldwide as a pioneer in geographical research and education in Geography for more than 163 years.  The mission of the American Geographical Society is to advance and promote geography in business, government, science, and education. Our goal is to enhance the nation’s geographic literacy so as to engender sound public policy, national security, and human well-being worldwide. AGS seeks to engage the American public, from its youngest to its oldest citizens, with new and amazing ways to understand and characterize our changing world. The Society maintains its headquarters in Brooklyn Heights, New York.

American Geographical Society


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Colorado Is Flatter Than a Pancake, and Kansas Is Not As Flat As You Think!

Description: A new study measured the flatness of U. S. states and found that (a) Florida is by far the flattest state, (b) Kansas is not as flat as most people think, and (c) all states are flatter than a pancake.

[New York City, NY] -- [5 March 2014] – In a new study being released today in Geographical Review, Dr. Jerome E. Dobson and Mr. Joshua S. Campbell show that conventional wisdom might be conventional, but it’s not always right!  Which U. S. state is flattest?  In a recent nationwide poll, 33% of respondents said Kansas and 23% said Florida. 

According to the study, Florida is correct by any measure.  Its highest point is only 345 feet above sea level, so no local view can have much relief.  Yet 77% of all national respondents, including 62% of Floridians, failed to recognize how overwhelmingly flat the place is.

Kansas? The Great Plains as a whole are not as flat as people imagine. Any mildly alert observer can see that most of Kansas is rolling to quite hilly.  When people visit eastern Kansas, they almost always express surprise that the terrain is not as flat as they expected.  Yet the state’s reputation is so pervasive across the US.

In 2003, a team of clever geographers from Texas and Arizona published a spoof proving that “Kansas is flatter than a pancake.”  Their conclusion was widely reported by news media and accepted as true by a public already inclined to believe that Kansas is flat.  Lee Allison, then director of the Kansas Geological Survey, conjectured that all states, including Kansas and Colorado, are flatter than a pancake.  Now an analysis by geographers Dobson and Campbell proves him right.  Indeed, Kansas would need a mountain higher than Mt. Everest in order to NOT be flatter than a pancake.  Imagine your favorite slumping, tilting, bubble-pocked flapjack stretched to the size of a state, and you will understand why.  However this is not the way people really perceive “flatness”.

"It may be easy to calculate a state’s flatness based on the difference between its lowest and highest points, but that’s not how people really experience it…they cannot perceive what they cannot see, and the curvature of the earth limits any flat surface view to only about 3.3 miles," said Dr. Dobson.

                "We performed a quantitative analysis of the contiguous United States, employing geographic software, digital elevation data, and a new algorithm for measuring flatness.  We took as our measure the viewpoint of a person standing on any spot and looking toward the horizon in all directions.  We repeated the calculation every 295 feet across the entire United States, and the computation ran for 36 hours on a fairly powerful desktop computer.  We aggregated these calculations for each state and determined flat land as a percentage of each state’s total area. Kansas came in number 7” added Dobson.

 Which state is the second flattest behind Florida?  Which state is least flat?  Illinois ranks second.

Which state falls dead last?  At least John Denver got that right when he sang, “West Virginia, mountain mama.”

And for those clever spoofers, Texas ranks 8th, only one notch behind Kansas, and Arizona ranks 14th!

For the complete results of the study, as well as maps and tables ranking all states except Hawaii and Alaska, go to Geographical Review (Dobson, J. E., and J. S. Campbell. 2014.  “The Flatness of U. S. States.”  Geographical Review 104(1):1-9.

Dr. Jerome E. Dobson is President of the American Geographical Society, Professor of Geography at the University of Kansas, and Jefferson Science Fellow with the National Academies and U. S. Department of State.  Mr. Joshua S. Campbell is a geographer and GIS architect with the Humanitarian Information Unit, Office of The Geographer and Global Issues, U. S. Department of State.

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States.  It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education in Geography for over 163 years.  The mission of the American Geographical Society is to advance and promote geography in business, government, science, and education. Our goal is to enhance the nation’s geographic literacy so as to engender sound public policy, national security, and human well-being worldwide.  AGS seeks to engage the American public, from its youngest to its oldest citizens, with new and amazing ways to understand and characterize our changing world.  The Society maintains its headquarters in Brooklyn Heights, New York.

Contact Information:

Dr. Jerome Dobson
785-864-5536
dobson@ku.edu

Or

American Geographical Society
32 Court Street
Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404
Telephone:  718-624-2212
Fax:  718-624-2239
Email:  ags@amergeo.org
www.amergeog.org

American Geographical Society


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


American Geographical Society Awards 2014 Council Fellowships

Description: The American Geographic Society (AGS), announced the recipients of the 2014 AGS Council Fellowships.

[New York City, NY] -- [27 February 2014] – The American Geographical Society (AGS) announced today the recipients of the first AGS Council Fellowships to support student research.  Sara N. Hughes, who is a Ph.D. student and political geographer at the University of California, Los Angeles and Oliver H. Wigmore, who is a Ph.D. student at The Ohio State University, were selected from a highly competitive field of applicants.

Ms. Hughes will use the money towards three months of dissertation fieldwork this summer in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank. The project explores why Israelis, many of them recent immigrants from the United States, would choose to live in a military-occupied area because of a sense of community and security. She hopes to address how residents are constructing these concepts, how security infrastructure facilitates a certain lifestyle, and how residents are defining danger, safety, and community.

Mr. Wigmore’s research combines field hydrology, satellite remote sensing, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) to identify drivers and quantify spatial and temporal variability in soil moisture storage in the pro-glacial valleys and wetlands of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. Funds from the AGS Fellowship will be used to purchase components for the development of a multi-rotor UAV capable of operating at 4,000 to 5,500 meters above sea level in the Andes and collect high resolution multispectral imagery. This platform will be used to map surface soil moisture, land cover, and glacier surfaces and to generate digital elevation models at centimeter resolution across the study sites.

“True to our roots in geographical exploration and discovery, the members of the AGS Council selected projects that reflect the changing nature of our world…the research projects we selected are important and what we learn from the results will have real-world applications”, said Dr. Marie Price, Chair of the Department of Geography at George Washington University and Chair of the AGS Council Fellowship Selection Committee.

The Council Fellowship was created in 2013 to support AGS student members in their pursuit of geographical knowledge and is worth $1,000.00.  In addition, AGS will promote the work and results of Ms. Hughes and Mr. Wigmore through its 2014 activities and publications.

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States.  It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education in Geography for over 163 years.  The mission of the American Geographical Society is to advance and promote geography in business, government, science, and education. Our goal is to enhance the nation’s geographic literacy so as to engender sound public policy, national security, and human well-being worldwide.  AGS seeks to engage the American public, from its youngest to its oldest citizens, with new and amazing ways to understand and characterize our changing world.  The Society maintains its headquarters in Brooklyn Heights, New York.

Sarah HugesSara N. Hughes; Ph.D. student and political geographer at the University of California, Los Angeles Oliver WigmorecroppedOliver H. Wigmore; Ph.D. student at The Ohio State University

 Contact Information:
American Geographical Society
32 Court Street
Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404
Telephone:  718-624-2212718-624-2212
Fax:  718-624-2239
Email:  ags@amergeo.org
www.amergeog.org

 

American Geographical Society


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


American Geographical Society Endorses World Economic Forum Report on Arctic

Description: The World Economic Forum (WEF), at its recent annual meeting, issued a report, “Demystifying the Arctic”.  The American Geographic Society, which is one of the original international organizations to support Arctic exploration and research, announced that it is endorsing the WEF report.

[New York City, NY] -- [20 February 2014] – The American Geographical Society (AGS) announced today that it is endorsing the recent report issued by the World Economic Forum (WEF) Agenda Council on the Arctic, “Demystifying the Arctic”.  The report was originally issued on 23 January 2014 in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland following its presentation at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos.

In preparing its report, WEF notes that:

         For longer parts of the year, Arctic sea ice is melting and the permafrost on land is thawing, with different implications for accessibility at an international level and way of life at a local level. The region possesses unique natural and cultural landscapes that are sensitive to a warming climate and enhanced human activity. Some changes, like increased risk of oil spills, are perceived as negative impacts. Other shifts present new opportunities, such as economic empowerment of native communities and seasonal shipping routes. However, keeping opportunities viable and minimizing negative climate change impacts require conscientious environmental and cultural stewardship that focuses on sustainable change. Diplomatic and economic actions can greatly affect the extent to which factors such as climate change and global commodity price fluctuations lead to economic, environmental and social changes…the complexities of transformations reshaping the region are profound, often lending themselves to misinterpretation and misplaced emotions. The natural starting point for the Council was to write a short booklet highlighting the five most prevalent myths, opportunities and challenges facing the region.

“AGS was at the heart of Arctic exploration and research for over 100 years and continues to focus on Arctic futures”, noted AGS President, Dr. Jerome Dobson.  “We believe that the recent WEF report on the Arctic is an extremely valuable study that ought to guide development and highlight the importance of preserving the precious natural and human resources of the area.  The myths about the Arctic have caused confusion among the general public and potential explorers and investors to the area for decades.  We commend the WEF for issuing a report that so clearly debunks the myths and offers reasonable recommendations,” added Dr. Dobson.

 

The full report can be found at:  http://www.weforum.org/reports/demystifying-arctic.

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States.  It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education in Geography for over 163 years.  The mission of the American Geographical Society is to advance and promote geography in business, government, science, and education. Our goal is to enhance the nation’s geographic literacy so as to engender sound public policy, national security, and human well-being worldwide.  AGS seeks to engage the American public, from its youngest to its oldest citizens, with new and amazing ways to understand and characterize our changing world.  The Society maintains its headquarters in Brooklyn Heights, New York.

The World Economic Forum is an independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. Incorporated as a not-for-profit foundation in 1971, and headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the Forum is tied to no political, partisan or national interests.

Contact Information:
American Geographical Society
32 Court Street
Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404
Telephone:  718-624-2212
Fax:  718-624-2239
Email:  ags@amergeo.org
www.amergeog.org

American Geographical Society


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


American Geographical Society Awards Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl Zimmerer


Description: The Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal, awarded by the American Geographical Society (AGS), is the latest of prestigious awards to be made by the Society and is presented to an internationally recognized Geographer for outstanding work on the dynamic relationship between human culture and natural resources. Dr. Karl Zimmerer, of Pennsylvania State University, the first recipient of the medal, received the medal on 6 December 2013 in New York City.

[New York City, NY] -- [11 December 2013] – The American Geographical Society awarded the first ever Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl S. Zimmerer last Friday at St. Francis University in Brooklyn Heights. Before an audience including AGS Councilors, geographic scholars, members of the Melamid family, and family and friends of Dr. Zimmerer, AGS Chairman John Gould and AGS President, Dr. Jerome Dobson, presented the medal to Dr. Zimmerer. Following the award presentation, Dr. Zimmerer presented a lecture on his most recent breakthrough research: “Giving Rise to Sustainability: Tropical Mountain Landscapes and Cities”.

Established in 2002, the Melamid Medal is one of nine medals awarded by the American Geographical Society and recognizes an internationally recognized geographer for outstanding work on the dynamic relationship between human culture and natural resources. Dr. Zimmerer’s recent work regarding the connection of sustainability and geography is considered to be central to the sustainability discussions and debates currently held across the world today. “Friday evening was a special night for AGS and the field of geography. Karl Zimmerer is one of the leading experts in the area of sustainability and without his work, it would be difficult to produce public policy that sufficiently guides sustainability” noted Dr. Jerome Dobson, President of the American Geographical Society. “His work has critical and practical real-world impact. It is an honor for us to have this opportunity to recognize such a valued colleague as the first recipient of the medal,” added Dr. Dobson.

Dr. Karl Zimmerer is professor and head in the department of geography at Pennsylvania State University and at the Earth-Environmental Systems Institute (EESI), the Institutes for Energy and the Environment (PSIEE), and in cross-campus programs on sustainability. He is also the director of the GeosyntheSESLab (Geographic Synthesis for Social-Ecological Sustainability). Dr. Zimmerer is an internationally recognized expert in the fields of historical and landscape-based cultural-and social-ecological analysis of sustainability, food security, and agrobiodiversity. He has also led research on land use, cultural ideas, social conflict and cooperation, and knowledge systems and the conservation-agriculture interface with resources and policies. Dr. Zimmerer has published five books and more than one hundred scientific and scholarly articles and chapters.

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States. It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education and has been awarding medals for outstanding accomplishments in Geography for over 117 years. The mission of the American Geographical Society is to link business, professional, and scholarly worlds in the creation and application of geographical knowledge and techniques to address economic, social, and environmental problems. The Society's work serves to increase geographical knowledge and the recognition of its importance in the contemporary world. With members worldwide, the Society maintains its Headquarters in Brooklyn, New York.

Mr. John Gould (l), Chairman of the American Geographical Society (AGS) presents the Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl Zimmerer (c) as Dr. Jerome Dobson (r) Presedent of AGS looks on Friday evening, 6 December 2013 in New York.

Contact Information:
American Geographical Society
32 Court Street
Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404
Telephone: 718-624-2212
Fax: 718-624-2239
Email: ags@amergeo.org
www.amergeog.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

American Geographical Society to Award Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl Zimmerer


Description: The Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal, awarded by the American Geographical Society (AGS), is the latest prestigious awards to be made by the Society and is presented to an internationally recognized Geographer for outstanding work on the dynamic relationship between human culture and natural resources. Dr. Karl Zimmerer, of Pennsylvania State University, the first recipient of the medal, will receive the Medal on December 6, 2013.

[New York City, NY] -- [28 October 2013] –The American Geographical Society announced today that Dr. Karl Zimmerer, Professor and Chairman of the Geography Department at Pennsylvania State University has been selected to receive the first Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal. The medal will be presented on December 6, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Founders Hall Auditorium at St. Francis University in Brooklyn Heights. Immediately following the awards ceremony, Dr. Zimmerer will present a lecture on his most recent breakthrough research:“Giving Rise to Sustainability: Tropical Mountain Landscapes and Cities”.

Established in 2002, the Melamid Medal is one of nine medals awarded by the American Geographical Society and recognizes an internationally recognized geographer for outstanding work on the dynamic relationship between human culture and natural resources. Dr. Zimmerer’s recent work regarding the connection of sustainability and geography is considered to be central to the sustainability discussions and debates currently held across the world today. “Karl Zimmerer is one of the leading experts in the area of sustainability and without his work, it would be difficult to produce public policy that sufficiently guides sustainability” noted Dr. Jerome Dobson, President of the American Geographical Society. “His work has critical and practical real-world impact. It is an honor for us to have this opportunity to recognize such a valued colleague as the first recipient of the medal,” added Dr. Dobson.

Dr. Karl Zimmerer is professor and head in the department of geography at Pennsylvania State University and at the Earth-Environmental Systems Institute (EESI), the Institutes for Energy and the Environment (PSIEE), and in cross-campus programs on sustainability. He is also the director of the GeosyntheSESLab (Geographic Synthesis for Social-Ecological Sustainability). Dr. Zimmerer is an internationally recognized expert in the fields ofhistorical and landscape-based cultural-and social-ecological analysis of sustainability, food security, and agrobiodiversity. He has also led research on land use, cultural ideas, social conflict and cooperation, and knowledge systems and the conservation-agriculture interface with resources and policies. Dr. Zimmererhas published five books and more than one hundred scientific and scholarly articles and chapters.

Established in 1851, the American Geographical Society (AGS) is the oldest professional geographical organization in the United States. It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education and has been awarding medals for outstanding accomplishments in Geography for over 117 years. The mission of the American Geographical Society is to link business, professional, and scholarly worlds in the creation and application of geographical knowledge and techniques to address economic, social, and environmental problems. The Society's work serves to increase geographical knowledge and the recognition of its importance in the contemporary world. With members worldwide, the Society maintains its Headquarters in Brooklyn, New York.

Contact Information:
American Geographical Society
32 Court Street
Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201-4404
Telephone: 718-624-2212
Fax: 718-624-2239
Email: ags@amergeo.org
www.amergeog.org

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